Filed under Hackery

Searched For:

Test Credit Card Numbers

Reason for Search:

I downloaded a new iPhone game called¬†Card Ace: Casino¬†last night. They give you $10,000 in fake chips to start off with, but it didn’t take me all of 20 minutes to squander it away, and I found myself jumping through hoops trying to score some more cash. The game offers some ways to earn a little money by signing up for various free online offers, but again, it didn’t take me long to lose it all.

One of the ways you could earn a ton of chips was to sign up for a subscription to People magazine. Having done a little work on an online store in the past, I remembered that there are certain fake credit card numbers that can be used by site developers to test the credit card transaction process. It seemed perhaps a little unethical, but since this was just to earn fake money in a game, I figured I’d give it a shot. To be clear, I wasn’t trying to actually order a subscription. I was just trying to trigger the event that would tell the game I deserved some free chips.

 

Conclusions:

  1. I should never ACTUALLY gamble.
  2. These numbers only work for testing and fail if you try to actually complete a transaction with them. I feel kind of dumb thinking it would work, but judging by the hundreds of comments I found where people were trying to literally purchase things online and have them delivered to their house, I felt like I was in good company.

 

Useful Search Results:

http://www.fivecentnickel.com/2010/03/01/how-do-you-know-if-a-credit-card-number-is-valid/

 

CategoryHackery Tagged , ,